Okonomiyaki

A few weeks ago, I talked about some of my favorite Japanese street foods. However, I left one out that is extremely popular both on the street and in restaurants across Japan. Okonomiyaki is a fried pancake, usually composed of batter and cabbage, which can have any number of toppings and mix-ins. This is reflected in its very name; okonomi literally means “to your liking” and yaki means “cooked or fried.”

Okonomiyaki

Via Flickr

While you can find okonomiyaki all over Japan, like ramen, the styles and toppings vary greatly from region to region. It’s most popular in the Kansai area of Japan (around Osaka, Nara, and Kyoto) and Hiroshima.

Okonomiyaki

Okonomiyaki from Osaka, via Flickr.

Like takoyaki, the pancake batter in okonomiyaki is not sweet. It’s filled with a number of savory ingredients, such as octopus, squid, shrimp, vegetables, or kimchi.

Just some of the ingredients you can put in okonomiyaki. Green onions, pickled ginger, egg, mushroom, and pork. Via Flickr.

Just some of the ingredients you can put in okonomiyaki. Green onions, cabbage, pickled ginger, egg, mushroom, and pork. Via Flickr.

In Japan, okonomiyaki is typically served at restaurants that only specialize in this dish. There is usually a large griddle at each table or in front of the customer at the bar counter, where the chef or server will cook the okonomiyaki for you.

Okonomiyaki

An okonomiyaki restaurant in Hiroshima. Via Flickr.

There are also many restaurants where you cook it yourself (like I tried), but I wouldn’t recommend this unless you know what you’re doing, or go with someone who has cooked it before!

okonomiyaki

Our personal grill at a cook-it-yourself okonomiyaki restaurant

First, customers order what ingredients they would like in their pancake and the server or chef brings out a bowl of raw batter, vegetables, and seafood or meat. Then, everything is mixed together and placed on the hot griddle in a pancake-like shape.

Okonomiyaki

Okonomiyaki

Mixing the ingredients

Okonomiyaki

Once one side is cooked, you use large metal spatulas to flip the pancake over. This is usually the hardest part of cooking okonomiyaki, and without patience or practice, it can end up breaking apart.

Okonomiyaki

Definitely the hardest part of cooking okonomiyaki. It took us a few tries to keep everything together (but it still tasted delicious!)

Once the pancake is cooked all the way through, you can add traditional toppings. First is okonomiyaki sauce (basically the same as takoyaki sauce), then Japanese mayo, katsuobushi (bonito fish flakes), and dried seaweed. Okonomiyaki is then usually broken into bite-sized pieces and left on the cooking surface, so that each piece is hot and eaten right off the griddle.

Okonomiyaki

Okonomiyaki sauce (brown glaze), dried seaweed (green flakes), katsuobushi (brown flakes), and Japanese mayo (white lines). Via Flickr.

This type of okonomiyaki (Kansai style) is the most popular and can be found all across Japan. In comparison, the Hiroshima style has layered ingredients rather than mixed. The batter is cooked like a thin crepe and the other ingredients are added as toppings, rather than mixed into the batter. Yakisoba or udon noodles are also an extremely popular layer, topped with a fried egg and a liberal amount of okonomiyaki sauce.

Okonomiyaki

Hiroshima style okonomiyaki. Via Flickr.

While this dish is extremely popular in Japan, I haven’t been able to find it at all in the US. Do you know where I could find some?

In the meantime, I guess I’ll have to try cooking it myself. Just One Cookbook, one of my favorite Japanese food blogs, has a great okonomiyaki recipe. Try it out, and let me know what you think!

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Japanese Food Blogs

Have you ever tried cooking Japanese food yourself at home? Now, I know sushi looks excruciatingly complicated, but there are so many other types of Japanese food that are easy to make in your own kitchen! Here in Boston, I constantly try to recreate the meals I enjoyed in Tokyo, such as tomato ramen, Japanese curry, and gyozas.

Homemade Ramen

My own homemade ramen!

I’ve found that many people are intimidated by unfamiliar ingredients, particularly ones that need to be purchased in Asian grocery stores. However, with the right recipes or inspiration, Japanese food is easy to make and extremely delicious.

On today’s Food Feature Friday, I’m divulging from my usual routine and featuring a few of my favorite Japanese food bloggers. So what are you waiting for? Get cooking!

1. Just One Cookbook

Just One CookbookJust One Cookbook is a Japanese food blog written by Nami, a Japanese native who now lives in San Francisco with her family. She posts traditional Japanese recipes that she makes for her family, from sushi and bento boxes to Japanese deserts. Each of her recipes is extremely easy to follow, and include professional photographs that will make your mouth water.

Oyakodon by Namiko Chen- Just One Cookbook

Oyakodon by Namiko Chen- Just One Cookbook

 What really sets Just One Cookbook apart is her explanation of many traditional Japanese ingredients. Nami goes through typical condiments, sauces, and essential foods that are common in Japanese households, but may stump a casual chef. She even explains many Japanese cooking techniques, including wrapping dumplings, preparing seafood for cooking, and even creating decorative garnishes.

Whether you’re looking for a creative bento box for your kids or a delicious recipe for dinner tonight, Just One Cookbook has you covered. Sign up for her emailing list and get new recipes straight in your inbox, with first access to food giveaways as well.

2. Sushi Day

Screen Shot 2013-11-15 at 10.51.46 AMSushi Day is a great resource for the aspiring sushi chef, or someone looking for new sushi recipes to try. The blog is written by Allison, a web developer from California who also has a passion for sushi. Sushi Day offers everything from simple nigiri (one piece of fish over rice) to inventive maki, such as Honey Green Tea Tilapia rolls, Unicorn rolls, and even rolls using leftover Thanksgiving food!

Lemon Drop Roll by Allison Day- Sushi Day

Lemon Drop Roll by Allison Day- Sushi Day

While Sushi Day is not a blog for beginners, as many of the recipes include sophisticated ingredients or require a few sushi skills, it’s still a great blog to check out. Even if you’re not a sushi chef, the great pictures will make you want to become one. Sushi Day also features tutorials, reviews, and photo features of Allison’s travels in both California and in Japan.

Porki Maki by Allison Day- Sushi Day

Porki Maki by Allison Day- Sushi Day

3. Luxeat

Luxeat

Although this blog isn’t about cooking and recipes, Luxeat is one of my absolute favorite foodie blogs to follow. It’s written by Aiste, a top fashion model who is also passionate about food and travel. Luxeat follows Aiste’s adventures travelling around the world, and the amazing fine cuisine she eats wherever she goes. She’s been to France, Berlin, Spain, Hong Kong, London New York and more, and always has amazing photos documenting her experiences.

My favorite part about Luxeat, however, is her adventures in Japan. Aiste has been to some of the top (and most expensive!) restaurants in Tokyo, Osaka, and Kyoto. From the legendary Sukiyabashi Jiro Ginza (made famous in the documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi) to the most expensive tempura in the world, Aiste has tried it all.

Luxeat is perfect for exploring some of the best high-end restaurants in Japan, especially since you’ll probably never get a chance to try them. Just be warned: your neighborhood sushi restaurant probably won’t cut it after seeing some of the masterpieces on this blog.

 That’s it for today’s Food Feature Friday! What are your favorite Japanese food blogs? I’m dying to read more!

Japanese Kaiseki

I’m a firm believer that food is art. In Japan, this is particularly evident in kaiseki ryori, a traditional multi-course dinner where each plate is as delicious on the eyes as it is on the tongue. Kaiseki meals are generally served at ryokan, traditional Japanese inns, and are as finely prepared as those you might find on tasting menus in haute cuisine.

Kaiseki are made with fresh ingredients, and each course is served as soon as it is prepared in order to maintain its freshness and integrity. There is usually a prescribed order of courses, however, the different types of ingredients in each dish depend on the season and location of the kaiseki,

I tried kaiseki in a ryokan in Kyoto, and had a chance to experience just how beautiful this meal could be. Kaiseki are often described as a meal in harmony with nature, with both the expert flavors and beautiful presentation of the food reflecting the shapes, textures, and seasons found in the environment. The plates and dishes are a reflection of nature as well, with different colors and shapes complimenting each course.

Because I tried kaiseki in November, many of my courses were decorated for fall and included dishes appropriate for colder weather. Keep reading to see exactly what I tried, and how each course traditionally progresses throughout the meal.

The menu

The menu

1. Shokuzen-shu (alcohol) and Sakizuke (bite-sized appetizer, similar to a French amuse-bouche)

Kaiseki usually begin with a small glass of sake or alcohol, with a selection of bite-sized appetizers. Mine included both sweet and savory elements, and were decorated with maple leaves.

Kaiseki usually begin with a small glass of sake or alcohol, usually locally made (lower right)

Sakizuke

Sakizuke

2. Hassun (a second course of bite-sized appetizers, usually seasonally themed)

DSC_55493. Soup

The soup course is usually a clear broth, with vegetables, seafood, or in my case, tofu.

The soup course is usually a clear broth, with vegetables, seafood, or in my case, tofu.

4. Sashimi

A selection of thinly sliced raw fish, served on a bed of daikon (radish). Also served with shoya (soy sauce) and wasabi

A selection of thinly sliced raw fish, served on a bed of daikon (radish). Also served with shoya (soy sauce) and wasabi

5. Shiizakana (a substantial dish)

Shiizakana is often one of the larger courses of the meal. At my kaiseki, we had shabu shabu, or meat and vegetables simmered in broth.

Shiizakana is often one of the larger courses of the meal. At my kaiseki, we had shabu shabu, or meat and vegetables simmered in broth.

Each guest had their own personal stove to cook the shabu shabu in!

Each guest had their own personal stove to cook the shabu shabu in!

6. Yakimono (grilled dish)

Grilled fish, usually from a local source

Grilled fish, usually from a local source

7. Nimono (boiled dish

Simmered vegetables

Simmered vegetables

8. Agemono (deep fried dish)

The deep fried dish is usually a selection of tempura, including fish and vegetables. It's generally served towards the end of the meal.

The deep fried dish is usually a selection of tempura, including fish and vegetables. It’s generally served towards the end of the meal.

DSC_56319. Mushimono (steamed dish)

Kaiseki often offer chawanmushi for the steamed dish, a savory egg custard with fish stock, and bites of mushrooms, chicken, and seafood. It's served in a teacup-sized lidded dish and eaten with a spoon.

Kaiseki often offer chawanmushi for the steamed dish, a savory egg custard with fish stock, and bites of mushrooms, chicken, and seafood. It’s served in a teacup-sized lidded dish and eaten with a spoon.

DSC_561710. Sunomono (vinegar dish)

Seafood and vegetables served in a vinegar-based sauce. This was probably my least favorite dish.

Seafood and vegetables served in a vinegar-based sauce. This was probably my least favorite dish.

11. Gohan (rice dish)

Rice with seasonal ingredients. This course was also cooked in individual pots at our seats.

Rice with seasonal ingredients. This course was also cooked in individual pots at our seats.

11. Mizumono (dessert)

Dessert at kaiseki are typically light, and consist of a small confection or fruit. We were served a fruit jelly.

Dessert at kaiseki are typically light, and consist of a small confection or fruit. We were served a fruit jelly.

 Because of the quality and number of dishes, kaiseki can get pretty expensive. At kaiseki with as many as 20 courses, the set can cost up to $500 per person.

However, you can typically find kaiseki lunch sets or bentos for a heavily discounted price, with the only exception that the dishes all come at the same time, rather than course by course. You can also get the kaiseki experience by staying at a ryokan (like I did), where the course meal is often included in the cost of your stay.

Thanks for reading once again, and I hope I made you hungry!