Shibuya

Welcome to Shibuya, home of the famous Hachiko statue, Shibuya Crossing, amazing restaurants, shopping, and some of the best nightlife in Tokyo. There’s seriously something for everyone here, whether you’re looking to shop for the latest fashions or enjoy a night of drinking and karaoke with your friends.

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Shibuya is always alive with neon lights and bustling streets, no matter what time it is. It’s a huge fashion center and particularly popular with young people, which is probably why I found it so fascinating. I like to call Shibuya the New York City of Japan, and if you ever visit there on a Friday night, you’ll see why.

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 When I first got off at Shibuya Station, one of the busiest stations in Tokyo, I was immediately greeted with the mind-boggling sight of Shibuya Crossing. You’ve probably seen it in popular films and TV shows, including Lost in Translation.

Welcome to the madness that is Shibuya Crossing!

Welcome to the madness that is Shibuya Crossing!

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Shibuya Crossing is one of the busiest crosswalks in the world. Cars stop in all directions, allowing hundreds of people to scramble across the intersection. The entire area is surrounded by large TV screens, advertisements, flashing lights, and modern architecture, adding another layer to the experience. It’s absolutely stunning at night and completely overwhelming, and yet Shibuya Crossing made me feel like I was really in Japan for the first time.

If you don’t believe me about Shibuya Crossing, check out the massive crowds in the video above!

If you manage to make it through the crossing alive, Shibuya offers a huge variety of shopping, restaurants, bars, clubs, and nightlife. There are several well-known Japanese department stores in the area, including Shibuya 109, Parco, and Loft, which offer everything from high-end clothing to bento supplies.

Even in the rain, Shibuya is always alive

Even in the rain, Shibuya is always alive

Step in any street in Shibuya, and you'll find dozens of quirky shops and amazing restaurants

Step in any street in Shibuya, and you’ll find dozens of quirky shops and amazing restaurants

And if you’re feeling hungry, don’t worry! You can find everything from ramen shops and kaiten sushi to restaurants specializing in whale meat, Alice in Wonderland cafes, and even…Krispy Kreme. I can’t even get Krispy Kreme in America anymore, but it was delicious in Japan!

Behold the wonder that is Krispy Kreme doughnuts.

Behold the wonder that is Krispy Kreme doughnuts.

Shibuya is also a huge center for nightlife in Tokyo. As the sun goes down, thousands of people flock to the multitude of bars, karaoke centers, clubs, and even “love hotels” that this district offers. Because the last trains in Japan stop running around 12:30 am and don’t start again until 4:30 am, many young people dance or drink straight until dawn. I certainly had plenty of days where I came home during the sunrise, and I enjoyed every second of it.

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After all, no one ever remembers the nights they got plenty of sleep.

This salaryman certainly knows how to party. I found him sleeping at 3 am on the streets of Shibuya.

This salaryman certainly knows how to party. I found him sleeping at 3 am on the streets of Shibuya.

If you ever visit Tokyo, make sure you visit Shibuya at least during the day. Even if you aren’t under 30 (and I saw plenty of older salarymen out at night!), it’s still an amazing experience to see the crowds and check out what the youth of Japan are up to. Head over to the Starbucks across from the station, grab a table near the window, and watch Shibuya come to life.

(Featured photo via Gaijin Camera)

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2 thoughts on “Shibuya

  1. looks like fun…amazing: more pedestrian traffic than cars in Shibuya Crossing. Is there some kind of “sign” that encourages cars to stop?
    It does remind me of New York City only cleaner…what’s a salaryman?

    • There are normal stoplights at each intersection that coordinate a complete stop of all traffic every few minutes! Luckily, jaywalking is illegal and severely looked down upon, so no one attempts to cross the intersection when there’s potential traffic. Otherwise, I can only imagine the accidents!

      As well, a salaryman is basically a white-collared worker in Japan! It’s become a cultural term to define Japanese businessmen. Thanks for your questions!

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